AMOC Mechanisms & Decadal Predictability Webinars

 

The Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program will host a webinar series on AMOC Mechanisms and Decadal Prediction, beginning November 2016. This series is based on recently funded projects in this area. Selected projects in this competition focused on multi-model analyses and experimentation that sought to better understand the mechanisms of AMOC variability and predictability in different models.

Register once for the entire AMOC Mechanisms and Decadal Prediction series.

Sign up to learn of future CVP Webinars.

These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. We look forward to your participation in this series.

For questions about the webinar series, please contact Hunter Jones ( hunter.jones@noaa.gov ).

AMOC Mechanisms and Decadal Predictability 
Date/Time Title & Presenters (presenting investigator listed first)

Thursday
3 November 2016
2pm

[Recording]

Low-Frequency North Atlantic Variability in the CESM Large Ensemble
Who Kim (UCAR); Ping Chang (Texas A&M); Gokhan Danabasoglu (NCAR)
[Slides]
Signature of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation in the North Atlantic Dynamic Sea Level
Jianjun Yin (University of Arizona)

Wednesday
9 November 2016
2pm

[Recording]

Investigation of AMOC in two GCMs using Linear Inverse Modeling
Cecile Penland (NOAA/ESRL); Douglas MacMartin (CalTech); Eli Tziperman (Harvard)
[Slides]
Suppression of AMOC variability at increased CO2
Douglas MacMartin (CalTech); Cecile Penland (NOAA/ESRL); Eli Tziperman (Harvard)
[Slides]
Modeling Effects of Greenland Ice Sheet Melting on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Variability and Predictability
Andreas Schmittner (Oregon State University)
[Slides]

Wednesday
16 November 2016
2pm

[Recording]

A Collaborative Multi-model Study: Understanding Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Variability Mechanisms and their Impacts on Decadal Prediction (part 1)
Young-Oh Kwon (WHOI); Claude Frankignoul (IPSL/LOCEAN)
[Slides]
A Collaborative Multi-model Study: Understanding Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Variability Mechanisms and their Impacts on Decadal Prediction  (part 2)
Yohan Ruprich-Robert (NOAA / GFDL / Princeton University); Rym Msadek (CNRS/Cerfacs), Frederic Castruccio (UCAR), Stephen Yeager (UCAR), Tom Delworth (NOAA/GFDL), Gokhan Danabasoglu (NCAR)
A Collaborative Multi-model Study: Understanding Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Variability Mechanisms and their Impacts on Decadal Prediction  (part 3)
Stephen Yeager (UCAR); Alicia Karspeck (UCAR); Gokhan Danabasoglu (NCAR)

 

Monday
28 November 2016
2pm
[Recording]

South Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation: Pathways and Modes of Variability
Renellys Perez (University of Miami - RSMAS); Ricardo Matano (Oregon State University); Silvia L. Garzoli (University of Miami - RSMAS)
Predictability of North Atlantic Ocean Heat Content
Martha Buckley (George Mason University); Rui Ponte (AER); Jason Furtado (University of Oklahoma); Patrick Heimbach (MIT)

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