Meet the MAPP Program's funded Scientists


Eric Maloney: Understanding the mysterious Madden-Julian Oscillation

From the front lawn of his childhood home in the Chicago suburbs, Eric Maloney, Professor at Colorado State University and NOAA-funded scientist, experienced extreme weather ranging from blizzards to severe thunderstorms. As a kid, he even videotaped a tornado. Maloney has been fascinated with the weather ever since.








John Nielsen-Gammon: Informing Texas with climate data and information

Texas State Climatologist and NOAA-funded scientist, John Nielsen-Gammon, has helped the state of Texas make the best possible use of weather and climate information for 17 years. "I became a climatologist before I actually did any climatology work," he said. 

 






Jason Otkin: Predicting rapidly-developing droughts based on plant stress

Growing up on a farm in Minnesota, Jason Otkin felt that the weather controlled everything in his life. In the middle of "farm country," Otkin's parents made a living herding cattle and growing corn, soybeans, alfalfa, and wheat. The farm was home to sandy ground that tended to dry up quickly in the summer after some hot and dry weather, causing crop conditions to rapidly deteriorate. 

 



 

MAPP

CONTACT US

Climate Program Office
1315 East-West Hwy, Suite 1100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

CPO.webmaster@noaa.gov

ABOUT OUR ORGANIZATION

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2011, the United States experienced a record high number (14) of climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 670 lives, caused more than 6,000 injuries, and cost $55 billion in damages. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.